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March 2010

The Secret Garden

Iguazu After touring Buenos Aires and Patagonia, it was time to turn our attention north, to the hot, humid jungle area of Puerto Iguazu, a frontier city that borders Brazil and Paraguay.

We'd debated whether it made sense to make the trip up there given our already-full schedule, but in the end, the lure of the famous Iguazu Falls was too great to ignore. So we booked a flight and made arrangements to stay at The Secret Garden Iguazu Bed & Breakfast, which had gotten rave reviews on TripAdvisor. It did not disappoint.

John and roxy The Secret Garden is owned and operated by John Fernandes, a commercial photographer who spent the bulk of his career in Buenos Aires. Four years ago, he moved to Iguazu to open his own gallery and settled in as the innkeeper of this 3-unit bed and breakfast. He's done a marvelous job of fusing his two interests - photography and conservation of the area's natural resources.

You enter the property through a whimsical gate adorned with toucans, which are native to the area (more on that later).

P1000430Inside the gate is John's gallery, which he has created as a resource for area residents to both appreciate art and learn about photography. He teaches classes in documentary photography to the local children using his own equipment, as well as cameras donated from corporations he's worked with over the years.

P1000581 It's really a lovely space, with a great mission.

P1000577 His current exhibit, "Tome el Mate," depicts local residents enjoying the national drink.
P1000579Behind John's home and gallery he has created a lush garden (hence, the name "Secret Garden") complete with tree ferns and other plants salvaged from logging activities that threaten the nearby rain-forest. Here, he has a fabulous deck where guests enjoy breakfasts of fresh papaya, toast, marmalade, and dulce de leche, as well as cocktails and hors d'ouvres every night at 7pm (Caipirinhas are his specialty! He uses the same brand of rum that Hemingway drank). We had the best time at these cocktail hours...talking with John and fellow guests (a couple from Michigan) about travel, books, culture, and all sorts of things.

P1000481 And let's not forget Roxy, John's sassy little Jack Russell terrier who joined us each day:

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The guest cottages sit behind the garden; here's ours:

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P1000426 It was really conveniently located, just a short walk from town, and right near a bus stop to head over to the falls (although John has a driver available for hire as well).

The city itself is rather small, despite its 70K headcount.  Mostly red, dirt roads, dotted with homes, supermercados and restaurants, plus the occasional roadside roast:

P1000482John took us on a quick tour, including where the Iguazu and Parana rivers meet at the shared border between Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay. The abandoned frame of a large convention center sits on the edge on the Brazilian side (look straight out beyond the dock in this photo), flooded and destroyed when the river rose just months before its grand opening.

P1000429 There is also a casino, which we made it to one night (interestingly, you can only gamble with US Dollars, due to counterfeit problems with the Argentinian pesos), as well as Aqva Restaurant, where we dined on delicious beef and local fish.

Besides that, we spent all of our time at the falls (which I'll cover in a separate post) or lounging at The Secret Garden. John was a fantastic host, and left us with this parting gift:

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Previously:

Vinciguerra Glacier

Gable Island

Isla Martillo

The Beagle Channel

Ushuaia

Trelew

Gaiman

Punta Tombo

Puerto Madryn

La Boca

San Telmo

Puerto Madero

Recoleta

Palermo


Vinciguerra Glacier

This day, the folks from Compañía de Guías de Patagonia picked us up at 9am for our six hour hike through the Andorra Valley and up to the Vinciguerra Glacier, one of the largest in the Tierra del Fuego.

Our Australian friends from the previous day - Stephanie and Mark - were on this trip as well, plus some new friends from California, Rachael and Michael.

After a short drive from our cabin, we arrived at a modest estancia in a lush field - a broken-down wooden fence surrounding a small, dilapidated house with two dogs chained out front. A red, dirt path wove back into the field, and armed with our walking sticks and packs full of water, lunch, cold weather gear, and crampons, we headed into the meadow.

P1000361The low-lying region was gorgeous: bright green grass, huge swaths of yellow flowers, horses roaming freely, a farmer on a tractor in the distance.

P1000366 A pair of falcons sat in the tree above us:

P1000363At the far end of the meadow, we passed through a peat bog, which formed after the glaciers retreated at the end of the last ice age. Our feet sunk into the fluffy, squishy soil in some areas, but bounced as if on a trampoline in others.
P1000368Next, we crossed through a wooded area, full of rocky and very muddy trails. This is where we started the vertical ascent up towards the icy glacier we could see in the distance. It would be a 3 hour hike up to the top, along which we saw a variety of birds and plants, including this wild orchid:
P1000369 We eventually broke through the tree line and arrived at a clearing with a waterfall. The water - all glacier runoff - was beautifully clear and drinkable (we refilled our water bottles with it). The air was crisp, clean, and cool; we had to put on our fleeces before continuing on up.
P1000370From here the trail became much drier and rockier as we climbed up towards the glacier - a huge sheet of thick ice looming above us. No trees, and very sparse vegetation from this point forward.

P1000375 We arrived at a lagoon - all glacial runoff and bright turquoise in color due to the minerals in the rocks. We stopped here for a break and to admire the Chilean mountains in the distance.

P1000376   A bit further up, we stopped again, this time for lunch, right on the edge of the glacier. The ice was thick, but you could see under it in some areas and there was a steady trickle of melting runoff. The glacier has receded a lot in recent years due to warmer temperatures.
P1000377 After lunch, we put on our crampons to walk on the ice. We also had to put on coats/hats/gloves at this point because it was really cold and windy up there.

P1000383Walking out on the ice was both exhilarating and nerve-wracking. We had to follow the guide in a straight line, because he knew by sight the safe areas on which to tread (you must avoid the snowy patches, which don't have ice underneath, meaning you'll fall right through!). We proceeded to climb up across the glacier's surface, including its cervices, caves and gullies.

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P1000389 Look at that view!

P1000390 This trip, while challenging, was so cool. Very memorable. As was all of Ushuaia; I think this region was my favorite part of the trip. Sadly, this was our last day there; the next series of posts will recount our travels up north, among the waterfalls and jungle of Iguazu.

Here is the full photo set from Ushuaia:

Previously:

Gable Island

Isla Martillo

The Beagle Channel

Ushuaia

Trelew

Gaiman

Punta Tombo

Puerto Madryn

La Boca

San Telmo

Puerto Madero

Recoleta

Palermo


Gable Island

Following our visit with the penguins on Isla Martillo, we hopped back in the boat for a short ride over to Gable Island, the largest in the Beagle Channel. It belongs to Haberton Ranch (mentioned in a previous post) and was where they used to take their sheep during the summer. Today, only a large shearing shed is left. 

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We walked inland a bit, enjoying the beautiful views of the Beagle Channel:

P1000325 Among the meadows was an old cabin where the crew set up a picnic lunch for us, complete with red and white checked table cloth, red wine, chicken salad sandwiches, chips, cubes of salami and cheese (big here), and brownies (yum).
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There was a small room to the side, filled with empty wine bottles:

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We then walked off lunch with a long hike around the island, with Federico pointing out the local flora and fauna. We tasted wild berries and mushrooms (!) and saw lots of birds, including this Caracara (falcon):

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There was some cool plant life here as well, like the Japanese Lantern, which actually attacks a tree like ivy does, but hangs from its branches in big, green star bursts:

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And the white, lacy lichen which only grows in areas where the air has a high percentage of pure oxygen (e.g., unpolluted):

P1000333 We also saw quite a few of the infamous beaver dams. Beavers had been introduced from Canada in the 1940s, in an effort to start up a fur industry here. With no natural predators, they have swelled in numbers and destroyed the surrounding woodlands. The Argentinians introduced the Silver Fox to the area in hopes that it would hunt the beavers, only to learn that the Silver Fox doesn't eat beaver. Now they have a fox problem as well. Doh!

Despite being a nuisance, their damns are really quite amazing. Here's one we walked across: 
P1000336 Finally, we arrived back at the mussel-covered beach where our boat was waiting to return us to the mainland.
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We headed back to our cabin to rest up before the next day's big hike up the glacier.

Previously:

Isla Martillo

The Beagle Channel

Ushuaia

Trelew

Gaiman

Punta Tombo

Puerto Madryn

La Boca

San Telmo

Puerto Madero

Recoleta

Palermo



Isla Martillo

After our paddling trip down the Larsiparsahk River and across the Beagle Channel, we took a short boat ride to the Isla Martillo to see another penguin rookery. They were all on the beach, waiting to greet us:

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This little fellow in particular, who was fascinated by the boat (most of the rest kept their distance from it):

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As in Punta Tombo, these were primarily Magellenic penguins who'd arrived at the beach earlier this summer to lay and hatch their eggs. The hatchlings are now teenagers in various stages of molting, but there were a few younger ones here with the fuzzy feathers. As the season is coming to a close, they'll soon migrate back up to the warmer waters of Brazil for the winter.

(Which reminds me of the passage in Bruce Chatwyn's In Patagonia where he recounts his chat with the local ornithologist about the migratory patterns of the Jackass penguin and "whether or not we, too, have journeys mapped out in our central nervous systems; it seemed the only way to account for our insane restlessness.")

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Also on this island is a second species of penguin - the Gentoo. These guys are a bit larger, have orange beaks and feet, and are native to Antarctica. This in fact the only place in Argentina you can see them. The penguins are hilarious and we stayed for a bit to watch them waddle, swim, and honk. 

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(Don't worry...this one's just resting)

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Next up: lunch at Gable Island. To be continued...

Previously:

The Beagle Channel

Ushuaia

Trelew

Gaiman

Punta Tombo

Puerto Madryn

La Boca

San Telmo

Puerto Madero

Recoleta

Palermo



The Beagle Channel

Early one morning a van from Canal Fun arrived to take us on a full day tour in and around the Beagle Channel, the strait separating the islands of the Tierra del Fuego at the tip of South America.

We were joined by three other couples (Mark + Stephanie from Australia, Rosie + Nivet from England, and a pair from Switzerland (?) whose names escape me), plus 2 tour guides. Ours was an English speaking tour - we later met up with another van carrying some Canadians who were on the French-speaking tour (and our Swiss couple chose to hang out with them, which is why I don't know their names!)

Frederico was our main guide (he and the entire Canal Fun crew were great - very knowledgeable and as the name suggests, lots of fun); he told us all about the area while sipping on a mate during the one-hour drive along unpaved roads (!) leading to our destination.

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We finally arrived at an open field along the banks of the Larsiparsahk River, where we were divided up into groups of four (we were paired with Stephanie and Mark), and were given waterproof pants, wellies, life jackets, and inflatable canoes.

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P1000278The weather was beautiful - sunny and clear, about 65 degrees - bright blue skies and snow capped mountains all around us.

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Tall grasses lined the riverbed, among which we saw all kinds of wildlife: gulls, geese, cormorants, caracara (a kind of falcon), and a large beaver.

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After paddling for awhile at a rather leisurely pace, we then needed to carry the canoes up onto a beach, cross a narrow strip of land, and then re-enter the water in the Beagle Channel. The conditions were much different here than in the river: a strong wind swept through the channel, making the water choppy and creating strong currents. We traveled along the coast, but when it came time to actually cross the channel to the opposite shore, we had to work hard to keep the canoe on course. It was exhausting! But very fun. 

When we arrived at the beach our tour vans were waiting with thermos-fulls of hot chicken soup. We proceeded to walk around the grounds of the Estancia Haberton, the oldest farm in the Argentine Tierra del Fuego, while our guides packed up the canoe gear.

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There were no cows in sight, but there was a beautiful ranch with wooden fences and cow hides strung over them, and lots of wild flowers.

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We then went up to the main house, where the next leg of the tour would start.
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From here, we boarded a boat to see Magellan and Antarctic penguins on the Isla Martillo, and have lunch on Gable Island. Watch for details in upcoming posts.

Previously:

Ushuaia

Trelew

Gaiman

Punta Tombo

Puerto Madryn

La Boca

San Telmo

Puerto Madero

Recoleta

Palermo



Ushuaia

Argentina It was dusk when our plane touched down on a very short runway in the middle of the Beagle Channel, the body of water between Argentine Tierra del Fuego and the Chilean island of Isla Navarino. 

We'd arrived at Ushuaia, the end of the world.

Ushuaia is, in fact, the capital of the Tierra del Fuego region of Argentina, and the southernmost city in the world...the last outpost of civilization before reaching Antarctica and the South Pole.  Originally known for the prison that was built there in the first half of the 20th century, it has grown to a population of 70K with a large tourism trade, thanks to the many natural wonders within (and beyond) its borders.

Although it was 9:20pm when we landed, it was still very light outside, with a large, clear moon, setting sun, and snow capped mountains surrounding us.

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A driver was waiting to take us to Cabanas del Beagle, a collection of 3 log cabins built into the side of a hill and overlooking the city and channel. We had read rave reviews about this place and its proprietor, Alejandro Chizzini, on TripAdvisor and were anxious to experience it ourselves. The reviews were spot on: Alejandro and his wife are amazing hosts! A loaf of homemade bread was waiting for us in the kitchen, and they invited us up to join them for dinner with the other guests, which was already in progress when we arrived.

The other guests included a Swiss couple that had stayed here the previous month, before embarking on a 3-week trip to Antarctica (the last leg of a four-month vacation). They were joined by a French couple on their honeymoon (they got married last August and are traveling for one year), and a 3-person sailing crew, also from France. 

An aside: Everyone we've met here (non-U.S.) has been traveling for a month or more. They are shocked to hear that we made this trip with just 12 days vacation. They have traveled the globe, speak multiple languages, and have amazing stories - none of which revolve around their jobs. In fact, most non-US people don't even mention their livelihoods, or inquire about yours...there are simply far more interesting things to talk about!

So the Swiss couple and the French couple had just returned from a sailing trip to Antarctica (they'd met each other on board). Seven of them had boarded a 67-foot sailboat to cross the Drake Passage, a harrowing experience from what I can tell: everyone had to work on the boat (3 hours above deck working, 6 hours below deck resting; repeat) despite driving wind, rain, snow, and sea sickness.

But they claim the payoff was worth it -  Antarctica was unbelievable, indescribable. Because they were a small group, they were able to visit the Chilean and Ukrainian scientists at the research station there (normally, large groups of people are prohibited from staying on shore for too long, never mind visiting with the locals), and partake in their homemade whiskey and karaoke machine (!). They also told us how they had strapped a lamb outside the boat so that it would be naturally salted by the sea, and when they arrived they made an asado, the traditional dish of Argentina (slow roasted lamb or other meat, hung on a cross and tilted over an open flame; it looks like this - although this was one we saw down in the town later that week).

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This group was really fun - we ate lamb, drank wine, and passed the mate. 
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Now let's talk about the lodging: so unique, so beautiful, and hand-built by Alejandro himself! Originally a research scientist, he left his job about five years ago to build and run these vacation rentals. He and his family live in a fourth cabin, situated highest on the hill, above the guest cabins.

The buildings are amazing: stone and log exteriors, big plate glass windows with water/town views, heated slate floors, fire place, and all manner of unique fixtures (e.g., big, old bolts for coat hooks and an old cast iron oven door hiding the in-wall safe deposit box).  There's even what looks like a giant whale (dinosaur?) bone over the doorway. Alejandro built nearly everything in the cabins (including furniture, staircases) from logs and architectural salvage.

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All of the fixtures were recovered from the South George Islands, east of the Falkland Islands and subject of the 1982 Falklands War with Britain). For years, whaling stations operated here under license from the British, but when the whaling industry ended in the 60s the stations were abandoned...leaving wonderful architectural salvage for Alejandro's cottages! 
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Now let's talk about the view from our cottage. Stunning!

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And here's the walkway up to the other cottages:

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And Alejandro's office (notice the ski poles and boots sticking out of the wall in the second shot):

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And here are some shots from the town. Very colorful!

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They also had these great little A-frame houses which I failed to get a picture of, but here's one from another traveler:

161 'A' frame house in Ushuaia

Lastly, there are a ton of great dining & drinking spots in Ushuaia. We only had a couple of nights there, but made it to:

  • The Dublin - a lively Irish pub that is the place to be in the evenings
  • Tia Elvira - the best place to sample Ushuaia's famous king crab legs (mine were broiled with parmesan, TJ's with oil and garlic. SO GOOD)
  • Kalma Resto - a relatively new spot which Alejandro recommended to us, and boy are we glad he did. The food was exquisite - each dish a work of art, complete with edible flowers and foam. We started with an amazing salad in a large flat-bread bowl (like a tortilla bowl) full of lettuce, avocado, brie, orange sections, and other stuff. I then had a salmon dish with cous cous and baby carrots and TJ had a Patagonian trout fish with spinach gnocchi. Both were stupendous. Dessert was a crazy chocolate concoction sitting on a layer of olive oil. Sounds weird, I know, but the oil actually mixed nicely with the bitter dark chocolate. The service was also spectacular - the chef even came out to greet us. Highly recommend this spot.

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We proceeded to have two fun-filled days of trekking around this area which I'll cover in future posts. Ushuaia was definitely my favorite part of this trip, and I hope to get back there some day!

Previously:

Trelew

Gaiman

Punta Tombo

Puerto Madryn

La Boca

San Telmo

Puerto Madero

Recoleta

Palermo



Trelew

We left Gaiman and headed back to Trelew, home of the Touring Hotel. This place was made famous by Butch Cassidy, the infamous US bank & train robber, who hid out there while running from the law.

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The hotel is basically frozen in time. It doesn't look like it's been updated since Butch himself was there. The bottom floor is a large cafeteria and bar; room keys hang on a board behind the bar, along with shelves of liquor bottles from yesteryear. 

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A faux Wanted poster keeps the story alive:

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(Incidentally, I read Bruce Chatwyn's In Patagonia while on this trip, where he recounts his journey through this region and includes notes on Cassidy's time there.)

Last stop, the Egidio Feruglio Paleontologic Museum, which contains over 1,700 fossil pieces and 30 specimens of dinosaurs from the area. Really quite impressive.

This is a femur (THIGH BONE)!!

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This is a fossilized dinosaur egg:
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Next, off to the airport for our flight down to Ushuaia, the end of the world.

Here's the full slideshow from Chubut:

Previously:

Gaiman

Punta Tombo

Puerto Madryn

La Boca

San Telmo

Puerto Madero

Recoleta

Palermo


Gaiman

Once we left the coast of Punta Tombo and moved inland to the valley along the Chubut River, the landscape changed from arid dirt and scrub to green fields and trees.

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We soon arrived at the Welsh village of Gaiman a five thousand person community just outside of Trelew that was settled in the 1860s. The founders had fled their homeland in order to escape English colonization. To this day, the community clings to its Welsh heritage and language.

The houses are built in the typical, austere Welsh style...

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...and the town is full of traditional tea houses. We stopped in at the original, Ty Gwyn Casa de Te, still operated by the same, original Welsh family.

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Tea is served in blue china cups, along with plates of cakes and scones.

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Teapots are covered in brightly knit tea cozies, like Grandma would have made:

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It was all very proper (and therefore, probably not S.C.O.R.P.I.O.N. approved). Especially this part:

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 It only takes a short drive to see most of the town. Here's the first house built there:

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The early settlers were apparently small in stature:

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Next, we head back to Trelew to hunt for dinosaurs and Butch Cassidy.

Previously:

Punta Tombo

Puerto Madryn

La Boca

San Telmo

Puerto Madero

Recoleta

Palermo


Punta Tombo

This day we enjoyed an early breakfast at our hotel (complimentary!) before being picked up by Martin, our tour guide for the day. The hotel hooked us up with Ryan's Travel, and we did a private tour through them so that we could see the main points of interest before our 7pm flight down to Ushuaia that night. Today's destination: Punta Tombo, a peninsula in the Atlantic Ocean that is home to the largest colony of Magellan Penguins in South America.

Martin is a fast-talking, blue-eyed Argentinian, originally from Buenos Aires but based in Puerto Madryn for the last 10 years. He was a wealth of information and very entertaining on our two hour drive south down Route 3. He told us he's a big NBA fan, and his highlight from last year was when Chicago Bull's player (and one of the world's tallest men) Eric Gingold took one of his tours. I like to think that we were his highlight of 2010 :)

Route 3 is the two-lane national highway that runs all the way from Buenos Aires to Ushuaia. In Patagonia, the view on both sides is a seemingly endless expanse of land...

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Martin explained that all of the land here is privately owned, primarily by sheep farmers. Merino wool is the main export, and it's not unusual for farmers to have 28 thousand acre estancias on which their sheep graze. We saw lots of them along the roadway, as well as Guanacos, wild llamas unique to this area. A good part of the road is unpaved as well, so we spent a lot of time bouncing around on the gravel in Martin's Ford Escort.

We arrived early at Punta Tombo, before the other tourists showed up, which was perfect. Turning off Route 3, we had to pass through private farmland before entering into the reserve. Check out this great old barn:

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Look closely and you'll see the Partridge Family milling about on the grounds:

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And this horse, who was checking us out:

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When we finally reached the reserve and parked the car, I was thrilled to see one, lone penguin standing there, as if to greet us. Little did I know what we'd find after a short walk further in, towards the coast: hundreds of thousands of penguins!!

This place is unbelievable: a strip of coastline, with red clay soil, random shrubbery, and penguins everywhere...standing alone, in pairs, in groups...adults, molting "teenagers," and fuzzy babies. About a half million of them, who migrate here each summer to lay their eggs

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They nest in bushes or in holes in the ground, taking turns overseeing eggs and/or babies. Magellanic Penguins mate with the same partner every year; the male reclaims his burrow from the previous year and waits for his female partner to return. Occasionally, a different male will show up to the burrow first and a fight ensues; if the intruder wins the fight, the lady penguin tends to pick him as her new mate. Ha!

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These guys were hilarious...waddling, honking like sea lions, napping, swimming. We even saw some teenager penguins "practicing" their egg hatching skills with rocks. Amazing!

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They aren't really afraid of humans; as you'll see below, we walked right up to them (they are protected so you can't touch them, of course, and they're likely to bite if you do). Many of them don't survive (sadly, we saw evidence of this);  climate change has displaced fish populations, forcing the penguins to swim 25 miles from the nest for fish and their partners back home are starving. Their large breeding colonies are also threatened by oil spills off the coast of Argentina.

This is our guide, Martin...note all the penguins under the boardwalk.

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We saw a lot of other animals on the reserve, like this Guanaco who pranced right through the colony (I love this shot ... look at the little penguin!)

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And these Rheas, ostrich-like birds native to South America:

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And some sheep:

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And this beautiful little Rufous Collared Sparrow:

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And let's not forget this little mama rodent and her kids. I can't identify her...maybe a degu, but I didn't notice a tail.

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This place was so cool. Really glad we made it here.

After a quick lunch of hamburguesas y empanadas we were back on the gravelly road for a 75km ride to Gaiman, a Welsh village that will be the subject of my next post.

Previously:

Puerto Madryn

La Boca

San Telmo

Puerto Madero

Recoleta

Palermo


Puerto Madryn

Map We left Buenos Aires and flew about two hours southeast to the province of Chubut, the northern part of Patagonia.

Arriving at the airport in Trelew, we then drove about 45 minutes north to the city of Puerto Madryn, a wealthy coastal community with lots of beach front homes and restaurants.

We actually shared a car (arranged for by our hotel) with two guys that run an Internet marketing firm in Buenos Aires. Our hotel is a client of theirs, and they were on their way to shoot photos & 360-degree videos for its website. I was interested to learn from them that web marketing is still rather new in Argentina - only around for the past 5 years or so.

We stayed at Hotel Territorio, a beautiful resort + spa on the edge of town, overlooking the ocean. It has a modern decor, mixed with Native South American influence - colorful woven rugs, leather couches, wooden accessories. It looks sort of industrial outside, but inside is quite lovely...

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We spent the afternoon walking the beach...

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...and having lunch at a beach front restaurant (pizza and beer, plus a plate of tiny, deep fried, whole fish...which we didn't eat once we realized what we'd ordered!).
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Just like in Buenos Aires, there are dogs running around everywhere here. My favorite was this mangy little terrier mix that was chasing birds on the restaurant patio. Super cute face and personality, but in bad need of some grooming and TLC :(

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And no lunch [in Argentina] is complete without coffee and dessert, so we stopped in at Havanna, known for its little cakes called alfajores (you may recall me mentioning these once or twice before):

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And later that day, returned to El Territorio for an early St. Patrick's Day toast with a cold, green beer. Yes, we certainly ate and drank a lot on this trip.

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Which leads me to dinner at the hotel, which may hold the title of best all-around meal of the trip (by gastronomic standards). In addition to the nice wine cellar, they offered fantastic cuisine. We started with a delicious salad of lettuce, carrots, cukes, tomatoes, corn, and hearts of palm. They were the best, sweetest cherry tomatoes I've ever had. Main courses were the famous Patagonian lamb (me) and beef tenderloin (TJ) with grilled vegetables. Followed by custard framboise. So good!

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So our first day in Puerto Madryn was sort of slow and lazy (much needed after all the running around we did in Buenos Aires!). But day two brings an adventure...to penguin country! Stay tuned.

Previously:

La Boca

San Telmo

Puerto Madero

Recoleta

Palermo